When my husband [Carl Sagan] died, because he was so famous and known for not being a believer, many people would come up to me — it still sometimes happens — and ask me if Carl changed at the end and converted to a belief in an afterlife. They also frequently ask me if I think I will see him again.

Carl faced his death with unflagging courage and never sought refuge in illusions. The tragedy was that we knew we would never see each other again. I don’t ever expect to be reunited with Carl. But, the great thing is that when we were together, for nearly twenty years, we lived with a vivid appreciation of how brief and precious life is. We never trivialized the meaning of death by pretending it was anything other than a final parting. Every single moment that we were alive and we were together was miraculous — not miraculous in the sense of inexplicable or supernatural. We knew we were beneficiaries of chance… That pure chance could be so generous and so kind… That we could find each other, as Carl wrote so beautifully in Cosmos, you know, in the vastness of space and the immensity of time… That we could be together for twenty years. That is something which sustains me and it’s much more meaningful.

The way he treated me and the way I treated him, the way we took care of each other and our family, while he lived. That is so much more important than the idea I will see him someday. I don’t think I’ll ever see Carl again. But I saw him. We saw each other. We found each other in the cosmos, and that was wonderful.

Ann Druyan (via whats-out-there)

(via sagansense)

“If all insects on Earth disappeared, within 50 years all life on Earth would end. If all human beings disappeared from the Earth, within 50 years all forms of life would flourish.”
— Jonas Salk, Biologist (via aurelle)

(via afro-dominicano)

lastuli:

Illustrated poetry: ‘Oh rascal children of Gaza’
Rafah-born author and poet Khaled Juma wrote a heartbreaking tribute to the children of the Gaza Strip amidst the missiles striking his hometown. At least 506 Palestinian children have been killed since Israel commenced its latest invasion of Gaza on July 8, 2014
Photograph #1: A Palestinian boy, who fled with his family from their home during Israeli air strikes, bathes his brother at a United Nations-run school in the Jabalya Refugee Camp in the northern Gaza Strip on July 31, 2014. The school is a designated shelter for Palestinians who were displaced by Israel’s offensive. Photo credit: Mohammed Salem
Photograph #2: A Palestinian girl reacts at the scene of an explosion carried out by the Israeli military that killed at least eight children and wounded 40 more in a public garden in Gaza City on July 28, 2014. Photo credit: Finbarr O’Reilly
Photograph #3: A traumatized Palestinian child is comforted by a man arranging care for him in a hospital in Gaza City following an Israeli air strike on July 9, 2014. Photo credit: Momen Faiz
Photograph #4: A Palestinian child pulls out toys from a box at a local market in Gaza City during a temporary ceasefire on August 6, 2014. Palestinian and Israeli delegations met in Cairo with Hamas demanding an end to the siege on Gaza and Israel demanding a demilitarization of the territory. Photo credit: Lefteris Pitarakis
Photograph #5: A Palestinian boy sleeps at a United Nations-run school in Gaza City on July 14, 2014, after fleeing with his family from their home in Beit Lahya. Photo credit: Mohammed Salem
Photograph #6: Doctors tend to injured children while a young girl sitting on her mother’s lap cries at a hospital in Rafah in the southern Gaza Strip on August 4, 2014. Photo credit: Eyad El Baba
Photograph #7: A Palestinian girl cries while being treated at a hospital in Beit Lahya following after sustaining injuries from an Israeli air strike on a United Nations school in the Jabalya Refugee Camp on July 30, 2014. Photo credit: Khalil Hamra
Photograph #8: Two Palestinians girls celebrate the first day of Eid Al-Fitr on the grounds of a United Nations school in the Jabalya Refugee Camp in the northern Gaza Strip on July 28, 2014. Their families are among the dozens that have fled their homes and sought refuge in the school. Normally, Muslim families in Palestine celebrate Eid Al-Fitr by visiting one another and gifting children with new clothes and shoes. Photo credit: Khalil Hamra
Photograph #9: One-and-a-half year old Razel Netzlream was killed after she was fatally hit by shrapnel from an Israeli air strike on an adjacent home the previous day. Her father carries her body to the funeral in Khan Younis on July 18, 2014. Photo credit: Alessio Romenzi
Photograph 10: A portrait of Shahed Quishta, 8, is fixed to a pillar in her home in Beit Lahya on August 16, 2014, after an Israeli tank fired a shell into the living room. She was killed on July 22, 2014. Photo credit: Khalil Hamra
lastuli:

Illustrated poetry: ‘Oh rascal children of Gaza’
Rafah-born author and poet Khaled Juma wrote a heartbreaking tribute to the children of the Gaza Strip amidst the missiles striking his hometown. At least 506 Palestinian children have been killed since Israel commenced its latest invasion of Gaza on July 8, 2014
Photograph #1: A Palestinian boy, who fled with his family from their home during Israeli air strikes, bathes his brother at a United Nations-run school in the Jabalya Refugee Camp in the northern Gaza Strip on July 31, 2014. The school is a designated shelter for Palestinians who were displaced by Israel’s offensive. Photo credit: Mohammed Salem
Photograph #2: A Palestinian girl reacts at the scene of an explosion carried out by the Israeli military that killed at least eight children and wounded 40 more in a public garden in Gaza City on July 28, 2014. Photo credit: Finbarr O’Reilly
Photograph #3: A traumatized Palestinian child is comforted by a man arranging care for him in a hospital in Gaza City following an Israeli air strike on July 9, 2014. Photo credit: Momen Faiz
Photograph #4: A Palestinian child pulls out toys from a box at a local market in Gaza City during a temporary ceasefire on August 6, 2014. Palestinian and Israeli delegations met in Cairo with Hamas demanding an end to the siege on Gaza and Israel demanding a demilitarization of the territory. Photo credit: Lefteris Pitarakis
Photograph #5: A Palestinian boy sleeps at a United Nations-run school in Gaza City on July 14, 2014, after fleeing with his family from their home in Beit Lahya. Photo credit: Mohammed Salem
Photograph #6: Doctors tend to injured children while a young girl sitting on her mother’s lap cries at a hospital in Rafah in the southern Gaza Strip on August 4, 2014. Photo credit: Eyad El Baba
Photograph #7: A Palestinian girl cries while being treated at a hospital in Beit Lahya following after sustaining injuries from an Israeli air strike on a United Nations school in the Jabalya Refugee Camp on July 30, 2014. Photo credit: Khalil Hamra
Photograph #8: Two Palestinians girls celebrate the first day of Eid Al-Fitr on the grounds of a United Nations school in the Jabalya Refugee Camp in the northern Gaza Strip on July 28, 2014. Their families are among the dozens that have fled their homes and sought refuge in the school. Normally, Muslim families in Palestine celebrate Eid Al-Fitr by visiting one another and gifting children with new clothes and shoes. Photo credit: Khalil Hamra
Photograph #9: One-and-a-half year old Razel Netzlream was killed after she was fatally hit by shrapnel from an Israeli air strike on an adjacent home the previous day. Her father carries her body to the funeral in Khan Younis on July 18, 2014. Photo credit: Alessio Romenzi
Photograph 10: A portrait of Shahed Quishta, 8, is fixed to a pillar in her home in Beit Lahya on August 16, 2014, after an Israeli tank fired a shell into the living room. She was killed on July 22, 2014. Photo credit: Khalil Hamra
lastuli:

Illustrated poetry: ‘Oh rascal children of Gaza’
Rafah-born author and poet Khaled Juma wrote a heartbreaking tribute to the children of the Gaza Strip amidst the missiles striking his hometown. At least 506 Palestinian children have been killed since Israel commenced its latest invasion of Gaza on July 8, 2014
Photograph #1: A Palestinian boy, who fled with his family from their home during Israeli air strikes, bathes his brother at a United Nations-run school in the Jabalya Refugee Camp in the northern Gaza Strip on July 31, 2014. The school is a designated shelter for Palestinians who were displaced by Israel’s offensive. Photo credit: Mohammed Salem
Photograph #2: A Palestinian girl reacts at the scene of an explosion carried out by the Israeli military that killed at least eight children and wounded 40 more in a public garden in Gaza City on July 28, 2014. Photo credit: Finbarr O’Reilly
Photograph #3: A traumatized Palestinian child is comforted by a man arranging care for him in a hospital in Gaza City following an Israeli air strike on July 9, 2014. Photo credit: Momen Faiz
Photograph #4: A Palestinian child pulls out toys from a box at a local market in Gaza City during a temporary ceasefire on August 6, 2014. Palestinian and Israeli delegations met in Cairo with Hamas demanding an end to the siege on Gaza and Israel demanding a demilitarization of the territory. Photo credit: Lefteris Pitarakis
Photograph #5: A Palestinian boy sleeps at a United Nations-run school in Gaza City on July 14, 2014, after fleeing with his family from their home in Beit Lahya. Photo credit: Mohammed Salem
Photograph #6: Doctors tend to injured children while a young girl sitting on her mother’s lap cries at a hospital in Rafah in the southern Gaza Strip on August 4, 2014. Photo credit: Eyad El Baba
Photograph #7: A Palestinian girl cries while being treated at a hospital in Beit Lahya following after sustaining injuries from an Israeli air strike on a United Nations school in the Jabalya Refugee Camp on July 30, 2014. Photo credit: Khalil Hamra
Photograph #8: Two Palestinians girls celebrate the first day of Eid Al-Fitr on the grounds of a United Nations school in the Jabalya Refugee Camp in the northern Gaza Strip on July 28, 2014. Their families are among the dozens that have fled their homes and sought refuge in the school. Normally, Muslim families in Palestine celebrate Eid Al-Fitr by visiting one another and gifting children with new clothes and shoes. Photo credit: Khalil Hamra
Photograph #9: One-and-a-half year old Razel Netzlream was killed after she was fatally hit by shrapnel from an Israeli air strike on an adjacent home the previous day. Her father carries her body to the funeral in Khan Younis on July 18, 2014. Photo credit: Alessio Romenzi
Photograph 10: A portrait of Shahed Quishta, 8, is fixed to a pillar in her home in Beit Lahya on August 16, 2014, after an Israeli tank fired a shell into the living room. She was killed on July 22, 2014. Photo credit: Khalil Hamra
lastuli:

Illustrated poetry: ‘Oh rascal children of Gaza’
Rafah-born author and poet Khaled Juma wrote a heartbreaking tribute to the children of the Gaza Strip amidst the missiles striking his hometown. At least 506 Palestinian children have been killed since Israel commenced its latest invasion of Gaza on July 8, 2014
Photograph #1: A Palestinian boy, who fled with his family from their home during Israeli air strikes, bathes his brother at a United Nations-run school in the Jabalya Refugee Camp in the northern Gaza Strip on July 31, 2014. The school is a designated shelter for Palestinians who were displaced by Israel’s offensive. Photo credit: Mohammed Salem
Photograph #2: A Palestinian girl reacts at the scene of an explosion carried out by the Israeli military that killed at least eight children and wounded 40 more in a public garden in Gaza City on July 28, 2014. Photo credit: Finbarr O’Reilly
Photograph #3: A traumatized Palestinian child is comforted by a man arranging care for him in a hospital in Gaza City following an Israeli air strike on July 9, 2014. Photo credit: Momen Faiz
Photograph #4: A Palestinian child pulls out toys from a box at a local market in Gaza City during a temporary ceasefire on August 6, 2014. Palestinian and Israeli delegations met in Cairo with Hamas demanding an end to the siege on Gaza and Israel demanding a demilitarization of the territory. Photo credit: Lefteris Pitarakis
Photograph #5: A Palestinian boy sleeps at a United Nations-run school in Gaza City on July 14, 2014, after fleeing with his family from their home in Beit Lahya. Photo credit: Mohammed Salem
Photograph #6: Doctors tend to injured children while a young girl sitting on her mother’s lap cries at a hospital in Rafah in the southern Gaza Strip on August 4, 2014. Photo credit: Eyad El Baba
Photograph #7: A Palestinian girl cries while being treated at a hospital in Beit Lahya following after sustaining injuries from an Israeli air strike on a United Nations school in the Jabalya Refugee Camp on July 30, 2014. Photo credit: Khalil Hamra
Photograph #8: Two Palestinians girls celebrate the first day of Eid Al-Fitr on the grounds of a United Nations school in the Jabalya Refugee Camp in the northern Gaza Strip on July 28, 2014. Their families are among the dozens that have fled their homes and sought refuge in the school. Normally, Muslim families in Palestine celebrate Eid Al-Fitr by visiting one another and gifting children with new clothes and shoes. Photo credit: Khalil Hamra
Photograph #9: One-and-a-half year old Razel Netzlream was killed after she was fatally hit by shrapnel from an Israeli air strike on an adjacent home the previous day. Her father carries her body to the funeral in Khan Younis on July 18, 2014. Photo credit: Alessio Romenzi
Photograph 10: A portrait of Shahed Quishta, 8, is fixed to a pillar in her home in Beit Lahya on August 16, 2014, after an Israeli tank fired a shell into the living room. She was killed on July 22, 2014. Photo credit: Khalil Hamra
lastuli:

Illustrated poetry: ‘Oh rascal children of Gaza’
Rafah-born author and poet Khaled Juma wrote a heartbreaking tribute to the children of the Gaza Strip amidst the missiles striking his hometown. At least 506 Palestinian children have been killed since Israel commenced its latest invasion of Gaza on July 8, 2014
Photograph #1: A Palestinian boy, who fled with his family from their home during Israeli air strikes, bathes his brother at a United Nations-run school in the Jabalya Refugee Camp in the northern Gaza Strip on July 31, 2014. The school is a designated shelter for Palestinians who were displaced by Israel’s offensive. Photo credit: Mohammed Salem
Photograph #2: A Palestinian girl reacts at the scene of an explosion carried out by the Israeli military that killed at least eight children and wounded 40 more in a public garden in Gaza City on July 28, 2014. Photo credit: Finbarr O’Reilly
Photograph #3: A traumatized Palestinian child is comforted by a man arranging care for him in a hospital in Gaza City following an Israeli air strike on July 9, 2014. Photo credit: Momen Faiz
Photograph #4: A Palestinian child pulls out toys from a box at a local market in Gaza City during a temporary ceasefire on August 6, 2014. Palestinian and Israeli delegations met in Cairo with Hamas demanding an end to the siege on Gaza and Israel demanding a demilitarization of the territory. Photo credit: Lefteris Pitarakis
Photograph #5: A Palestinian boy sleeps at a United Nations-run school in Gaza City on July 14, 2014, after fleeing with his family from their home in Beit Lahya. Photo credit: Mohammed Salem
Photograph #6: Doctors tend to injured children while a young girl sitting on her mother’s lap cries at a hospital in Rafah in the southern Gaza Strip on August 4, 2014. Photo credit: Eyad El Baba
Photograph #7: A Palestinian girl cries while being treated at a hospital in Beit Lahya following after sustaining injuries from an Israeli air strike on a United Nations school in the Jabalya Refugee Camp on July 30, 2014. Photo credit: Khalil Hamra
Photograph #8: Two Palestinians girls celebrate the first day of Eid Al-Fitr on the grounds of a United Nations school in the Jabalya Refugee Camp in the northern Gaza Strip on July 28, 2014. Their families are among the dozens that have fled their homes and sought refuge in the school. Normally, Muslim families in Palestine celebrate Eid Al-Fitr by visiting one another and gifting children with new clothes and shoes. Photo credit: Khalil Hamra
Photograph #9: One-and-a-half year old Razel Netzlream was killed after she was fatally hit by shrapnel from an Israeli air strike on an adjacent home the previous day. Her father carries her body to the funeral in Khan Younis on July 18, 2014. Photo credit: Alessio Romenzi
Photograph 10: A portrait of Shahed Quishta, 8, is fixed to a pillar in her home in Beit Lahya on August 16, 2014, after an Israeli tank fired a shell into the living room. She was killed on July 22, 2014. Photo credit: Khalil Hamra
lastuli:

Illustrated poetry: ‘Oh rascal children of Gaza’
Rafah-born author and poet Khaled Juma wrote a heartbreaking tribute to the children of the Gaza Strip amidst the missiles striking his hometown. At least 506 Palestinian children have been killed since Israel commenced its latest invasion of Gaza on July 8, 2014
Photograph #1: A Palestinian boy, who fled with his family from their home during Israeli air strikes, bathes his brother at a United Nations-run school in the Jabalya Refugee Camp in the northern Gaza Strip on July 31, 2014. The school is a designated shelter for Palestinians who were displaced by Israel’s offensive. Photo credit: Mohammed Salem
Photograph #2: A Palestinian girl reacts at the scene of an explosion carried out by the Israeli military that killed at least eight children and wounded 40 more in a public garden in Gaza City on July 28, 2014. Photo credit: Finbarr O’Reilly
Photograph #3: A traumatized Palestinian child is comforted by a man arranging care for him in a hospital in Gaza City following an Israeli air strike on July 9, 2014. Photo credit: Momen Faiz
Photograph #4: A Palestinian child pulls out toys from a box at a local market in Gaza City during a temporary ceasefire on August 6, 2014. Palestinian and Israeli delegations met in Cairo with Hamas demanding an end to the siege on Gaza and Israel demanding a demilitarization of the territory. Photo credit: Lefteris Pitarakis
Photograph #5: A Palestinian boy sleeps at a United Nations-run school in Gaza City on July 14, 2014, after fleeing with his family from their home in Beit Lahya. Photo credit: Mohammed Salem
Photograph #6: Doctors tend to injured children while a young girl sitting on her mother’s lap cries at a hospital in Rafah in the southern Gaza Strip on August 4, 2014. Photo credit: Eyad El Baba
Photograph #7: A Palestinian girl cries while being treated at a hospital in Beit Lahya following after sustaining injuries from an Israeli air strike on a United Nations school in the Jabalya Refugee Camp on July 30, 2014. Photo credit: Khalil Hamra
Photograph #8: Two Palestinians girls celebrate the first day of Eid Al-Fitr on the grounds of a United Nations school in the Jabalya Refugee Camp in the northern Gaza Strip on July 28, 2014. Their families are among the dozens that have fled their homes and sought refuge in the school. Normally, Muslim families in Palestine celebrate Eid Al-Fitr by visiting one another and gifting children with new clothes and shoes. Photo credit: Khalil Hamra
Photograph #9: One-and-a-half year old Razel Netzlream was killed after she was fatally hit by shrapnel from an Israeli air strike on an adjacent home the previous day. Her father carries her body to the funeral in Khan Younis on July 18, 2014. Photo credit: Alessio Romenzi
Photograph 10: A portrait of Shahed Quishta, 8, is fixed to a pillar in her home in Beit Lahya on August 16, 2014, after an Israeli tank fired a shell into the living room. She was killed on July 22, 2014. Photo credit: Khalil Hamra
lastuli:

Illustrated poetry: ‘Oh rascal children of Gaza’
Rafah-born author and poet Khaled Juma wrote a heartbreaking tribute to the children of the Gaza Strip amidst the missiles striking his hometown. At least 506 Palestinian children have been killed since Israel commenced its latest invasion of Gaza on July 8, 2014
Photograph #1: A Palestinian boy, who fled with his family from their home during Israeli air strikes, bathes his brother at a United Nations-run school in the Jabalya Refugee Camp in the northern Gaza Strip on July 31, 2014. The school is a designated shelter for Palestinians who were displaced by Israel’s offensive. Photo credit: Mohammed Salem
Photograph #2: A Palestinian girl reacts at the scene of an explosion carried out by the Israeli military that killed at least eight children and wounded 40 more in a public garden in Gaza City on July 28, 2014. Photo credit: Finbarr O’Reilly
Photograph #3: A traumatized Palestinian child is comforted by a man arranging care for him in a hospital in Gaza City following an Israeli air strike on July 9, 2014. Photo credit: Momen Faiz
Photograph #4: A Palestinian child pulls out toys from a box at a local market in Gaza City during a temporary ceasefire on August 6, 2014. Palestinian and Israeli delegations met in Cairo with Hamas demanding an end to the siege on Gaza and Israel demanding a demilitarization of the territory. Photo credit: Lefteris Pitarakis
Photograph #5: A Palestinian boy sleeps at a United Nations-run school in Gaza City on July 14, 2014, after fleeing with his family from their home in Beit Lahya. Photo credit: Mohammed Salem
Photograph #6: Doctors tend to injured children while a young girl sitting on her mother’s lap cries at a hospital in Rafah in the southern Gaza Strip on August 4, 2014. Photo credit: Eyad El Baba
Photograph #7: A Palestinian girl cries while being treated at a hospital in Beit Lahya following after sustaining injuries from an Israeli air strike on a United Nations school in the Jabalya Refugee Camp on July 30, 2014. Photo credit: Khalil Hamra
Photograph #8: Two Palestinians girls celebrate the first day of Eid Al-Fitr on the grounds of a United Nations school in the Jabalya Refugee Camp in the northern Gaza Strip on July 28, 2014. Their families are among the dozens that have fled their homes and sought refuge in the school. Normally, Muslim families in Palestine celebrate Eid Al-Fitr by visiting one another and gifting children with new clothes and shoes. Photo credit: Khalil Hamra
Photograph #9: One-and-a-half year old Razel Netzlream was killed after she was fatally hit by shrapnel from an Israeli air strike on an adjacent home the previous day. Her father carries her body to the funeral in Khan Younis on July 18, 2014. Photo credit: Alessio Romenzi
Photograph 10: A portrait of Shahed Quishta, 8, is fixed to a pillar in her home in Beit Lahya on August 16, 2014, after an Israeli tank fired a shell into the living room. She was killed on July 22, 2014. Photo credit: Khalil Hamra
lastuli:

Illustrated poetry: ‘Oh rascal children of Gaza’
Rafah-born author and poet Khaled Juma wrote a heartbreaking tribute to the children of the Gaza Strip amidst the missiles striking his hometown. At least 506 Palestinian children have been killed since Israel commenced its latest invasion of Gaza on July 8, 2014
Photograph #1: A Palestinian boy, who fled with his family from their home during Israeli air strikes, bathes his brother at a United Nations-run school in the Jabalya Refugee Camp in the northern Gaza Strip on July 31, 2014. The school is a designated shelter for Palestinians who were displaced by Israel’s offensive. Photo credit: Mohammed Salem
Photograph #2: A Palestinian girl reacts at the scene of an explosion carried out by the Israeli military that killed at least eight children and wounded 40 more in a public garden in Gaza City on July 28, 2014. Photo credit: Finbarr O’Reilly
Photograph #3: A traumatized Palestinian child is comforted by a man arranging care for him in a hospital in Gaza City following an Israeli air strike on July 9, 2014. Photo credit: Momen Faiz
Photograph #4: A Palestinian child pulls out toys from a box at a local market in Gaza City during a temporary ceasefire on August 6, 2014. Palestinian and Israeli delegations met in Cairo with Hamas demanding an end to the siege on Gaza and Israel demanding a demilitarization of the territory. Photo credit: Lefteris Pitarakis
Photograph #5: A Palestinian boy sleeps at a United Nations-run school in Gaza City on July 14, 2014, after fleeing with his family from their home in Beit Lahya. Photo credit: Mohammed Salem
Photograph #6: Doctors tend to injured children while a young girl sitting on her mother’s lap cries at a hospital in Rafah in the southern Gaza Strip on August 4, 2014. Photo credit: Eyad El Baba
Photograph #7: A Palestinian girl cries while being treated at a hospital in Beit Lahya following after sustaining injuries from an Israeli air strike on a United Nations school in the Jabalya Refugee Camp on July 30, 2014. Photo credit: Khalil Hamra
Photograph #8: Two Palestinians girls celebrate the first day of Eid Al-Fitr on the grounds of a United Nations school in the Jabalya Refugee Camp in the northern Gaza Strip on July 28, 2014. Their families are among the dozens that have fled their homes and sought refuge in the school. Normally, Muslim families in Palestine celebrate Eid Al-Fitr by visiting one another and gifting children with new clothes and shoes. Photo credit: Khalil Hamra
Photograph #9: One-and-a-half year old Razel Netzlream was killed after she was fatally hit by shrapnel from an Israeli air strike on an adjacent home the previous day. Her father carries her body to the funeral in Khan Younis on July 18, 2014. Photo credit: Alessio Romenzi
Photograph 10: A portrait of Shahed Quishta, 8, is fixed to a pillar in her home in Beit Lahya on August 16, 2014, after an Israeli tank fired a shell into the living room. She was killed on July 22, 2014. Photo credit: Khalil Hamra
lastuli:

Illustrated poetry: ‘Oh rascal children of Gaza’
Rafah-born author and poet Khaled Juma wrote a heartbreaking tribute to the children of the Gaza Strip amidst the missiles striking his hometown. At least 506 Palestinian children have been killed since Israel commenced its latest invasion of Gaza on July 8, 2014
Photograph #1: A Palestinian boy, who fled with his family from their home during Israeli air strikes, bathes his brother at a United Nations-run school in the Jabalya Refugee Camp in the northern Gaza Strip on July 31, 2014. The school is a designated shelter for Palestinians who were displaced by Israel’s offensive. Photo credit: Mohammed Salem
Photograph #2: A Palestinian girl reacts at the scene of an explosion carried out by the Israeli military that killed at least eight children and wounded 40 more in a public garden in Gaza City on July 28, 2014. Photo credit: Finbarr O’Reilly
Photograph #3: A traumatized Palestinian child is comforted by a man arranging care for him in a hospital in Gaza City following an Israeli air strike on July 9, 2014. Photo credit: Momen Faiz
Photograph #4: A Palestinian child pulls out toys from a box at a local market in Gaza City during a temporary ceasefire on August 6, 2014. Palestinian and Israeli delegations met in Cairo with Hamas demanding an end to the siege on Gaza and Israel demanding a demilitarization of the territory. Photo credit: Lefteris Pitarakis
Photograph #5: A Palestinian boy sleeps at a United Nations-run school in Gaza City on July 14, 2014, after fleeing with his family from their home in Beit Lahya. Photo credit: Mohammed Salem
Photograph #6: Doctors tend to injured children while a young girl sitting on her mother’s lap cries at a hospital in Rafah in the southern Gaza Strip on August 4, 2014. Photo credit: Eyad El Baba
Photograph #7: A Palestinian girl cries while being treated at a hospital in Beit Lahya following after sustaining injuries from an Israeli air strike on a United Nations school in the Jabalya Refugee Camp on July 30, 2014. Photo credit: Khalil Hamra
Photograph #8: Two Palestinians girls celebrate the first day of Eid Al-Fitr on the grounds of a United Nations school in the Jabalya Refugee Camp in the northern Gaza Strip on July 28, 2014. Their families are among the dozens that have fled their homes and sought refuge in the school. Normally, Muslim families in Palestine celebrate Eid Al-Fitr by visiting one another and gifting children with new clothes and shoes. Photo credit: Khalil Hamra
Photograph #9: One-and-a-half year old Razel Netzlream was killed after she was fatally hit by shrapnel from an Israeli air strike on an adjacent home the previous day. Her father carries her body to the funeral in Khan Younis on July 18, 2014. Photo credit: Alessio Romenzi
Photograph 10: A portrait of Shahed Quishta, 8, is fixed to a pillar in her home in Beit Lahya on August 16, 2014, after an Israeli tank fired a shell into the living room. She was killed on July 22, 2014. Photo credit: Khalil Hamra
lastuli:

Illustrated poetry: ‘Oh rascal children of Gaza’
Rafah-born author and poet Khaled Juma wrote a heartbreaking tribute to the children of the Gaza Strip amidst the missiles striking his hometown. At least 506 Palestinian children have been killed since Israel commenced its latest invasion of Gaza on July 8, 2014
Photograph #1: A Palestinian boy, who fled with his family from their home during Israeli air strikes, bathes his brother at a United Nations-run school in the Jabalya Refugee Camp in the northern Gaza Strip on July 31, 2014. The school is a designated shelter for Palestinians who were displaced by Israel’s offensive. Photo credit: Mohammed Salem
Photograph #2: A Palestinian girl reacts at the scene of an explosion carried out by the Israeli military that killed at least eight children and wounded 40 more in a public garden in Gaza City on July 28, 2014. Photo credit: Finbarr O’Reilly
Photograph #3: A traumatized Palestinian child is comforted by a man arranging care for him in a hospital in Gaza City following an Israeli air strike on July 9, 2014. Photo credit: Momen Faiz
Photograph #4: A Palestinian child pulls out toys from a box at a local market in Gaza City during a temporary ceasefire on August 6, 2014. Palestinian and Israeli delegations met in Cairo with Hamas demanding an end to the siege on Gaza and Israel demanding a demilitarization of the territory. Photo credit: Lefteris Pitarakis
Photograph #5: A Palestinian boy sleeps at a United Nations-run school in Gaza City on July 14, 2014, after fleeing with his family from their home in Beit Lahya. Photo credit: Mohammed Salem
Photograph #6: Doctors tend to injured children while a young girl sitting on her mother’s lap cries at a hospital in Rafah in the southern Gaza Strip on August 4, 2014. Photo credit: Eyad El Baba
Photograph #7: A Palestinian girl cries while being treated at a hospital in Beit Lahya following after sustaining injuries from an Israeli air strike on a United Nations school in the Jabalya Refugee Camp on July 30, 2014. Photo credit: Khalil Hamra
Photograph #8: Two Palestinians girls celebrate the first day of Eid Al-Fitr on the grounds of a United Nations school in the Jabalya Refugee Camp in the northern Gaza Strip on July 28, 2014. Their families are among the dozens that have fled their homes and sought refuge in the school. Normally, Muslim families in Palestine celebrate Eid Al-Fitr by visiting one another and gifting children with new clothes and shoes. Photo credit: Khalil Hamra
Photograph #9: One-and-a-half year old Razel Netzlream was killed after she was fatally hit by shrapnel from an Israeli air strike on an adjacent home the previous day. Her father carries her body to the funeral in Khan Younis on July 18, 2014. Photo credit: Alessio Romenzi
Photograph 10: A portrait of Shahed Quishta, 8, is fixed to a pillar in her home in Beit Lahya on August 16, 2014, after an Israeli tank fired a shell into the living room. She was killed on July 22, 2014. Photo credit: Khalil Hamra

lastuli:

Illustrated poetry: ‘Oh rascal children of Gaza’

Rafah-born author and poet Khaled Juma wrote a heartbreaking tribute to the children of the Gaza Strip amidst the missiles striking his hometown. At least 506 Palestinian children have been killed since Israel commenced its latest invasion of Gaza on July 8, 2014

Photograph #1: A Palestinian boy, who fled with his family from their home during Israeli air strikes, bathes his brother at a United Nations-run school in the Jabalya Refugee Camp in the northern Gaza Strip on July 31, 2014. The school is a designated shelter for Palestinians who were displaced by Israel’s offensive. Photo credit: Mohammed Salem

Photograph #2: A Palestinian girl reacts at the scene of an explosion carried out by the Israeli military that killed at least eight children and wounded 40 more in a public garden in Gaza City on July 28, 2014. Photo credit: Finbarr O’Reilly

Photograph #3: A traumatized Palestinian child is comforted by a man arranging care for him in a hospital in Gaza City following an Israeli air strike on July 9, 2014. Photo credit: Momen Faiz

Photograph #4: A Palestinian child pulls out toys from a box at a local market in Gaza City during a temporary ceasefire on August 6, 2014. Palestinian and Israeli delegations met in Cairo with Hamas demanding an end to the siege on Gaza and Israel demanding a demilitarization of the territory. Photo credit: Lefteris Pitarakis

Photograph #5: A Palestinian boy sleeps at a United Nations-run school in Gaza City on July 14, 2014, after fleeing with his family from their home in Beit Lahya. Photo credit: Mohammed Salem

Photograph #6: Doctors tend to injured children while a young girl sitting on her mother’s lap cries at a hospital in Rafah in the southern Gaza Strip on August 4, 2014. Photo credit: Eyad El Baba

Photograph #7: A Palestinian girl cries while being treated at a hospital in Beit Lahya following after sustaining injuries from an Israeli air strike on a United Nations school in the Jabalya Refugee Camp on July 30, 2014. Photo credit: Khalil Hamra

Photograph #8: Two Palestinians girls celebrate the first day of Eid Al-Fitr on the grounds of a United Nations school in the Jabalya Refugee Camp in the northern Gaza Strip on July 28, 2014. Their families are among the dozens that have fled their homes and sought refuge in the school. Normally, Muslim families in Palestine celebrate Eid Al-Fitr by visiting one another and gifting children with new clothes and shoes. Photo credit: Khalil Hamra

Photograph #9: One-and-a-half year old Razel Netzlream was killed after she was fatally hit by shrapnel from an Israeli air strike on an adjacent home the previous day. Her father carries her body to the funeral in Khan Younis on July 18, 2014. Photo credit: Alessio Romenzi

Photograph 10: A portrait of Shahed Quishta, 8, is fixed to a pillar in her home in Beit Lahya on August 16, 2014, after an Israeli tank fired a shell into the living room. She was killed on July 22, 2014. Photo credit: Khalil Hamra

(via knowledgeequalsblackpower)

The main problem I have with Men’s Rights Activists is that their name really doesn’t do them justice. They’re Straight Cis White Men’s Rights Activists. I have NEVER seen Men’s Rights Activists campaign for the inclusion of trans* men in their spaces.

I have NEVER seen Men’s Rights Activists campaign to end the social stigma around black fatherhood. I have NEVER seen Men’s Rights Activists campaign for better pay and equal career mobility for men of colour. I have NEVER seen Men’s Rights Activists actively campaign for more gay men’s rights. I have NEVER seen Men’s Rights Activists advise others in their group on how using f*ggot to emasculate men who aren’t part of their cause is alienating and marginalising other MEN.

I have NEVER seen Men’s Rights Activists campaign, raise awareness of, or support victims of male rape unless it’s in order to derail a discussion around female victims of rape. I have NEVER seen Men’s Rights Activists campaign, raise awareness of, or support male victims of domestic abuse unless it’s in order to derail a discussion around female victims of domestic abuse. Men’s Rights Activists are hypocrites and frauds.

They’re bitter privileged white men who don’t want to campaign for the rights of men — they want to campaign to keep their privilege unchecked and their ability to discriminate against others. If you want to be a real Men’s Rights Activist — be a fucking (intersectional) Feminist. Peace out.

(via meelo-dot-net)

All of this. The only men they care about are themselves, and the only thing they don’t like is that they might be treated the same way as everyone else.

(via thebicker)

(via definitelydope)

il-tenore-regina:

dynastylnoire:

jspark3000:

image

Ryo Oyamada, a 24 year old student from Japan, was struck and killed by an NYPD vehicle in a hit & run.  Witnesses say the police car had no lights or sirens on and was going over 70 mph.  The released footage by NYPD was proven to be heavily altered in a cover-up, showing “lights” on the vehicle, when compared to footage from the NY Housing Authority on the same street with the same timestamp. 

On a personal note: I know that this will probably not be shared or reblogged very much, because Asians are not very prominent in American culture.  I understand this, because Asians (like me) are partially at fault for being so passive.  But I am begging you to please consider signing this petition out of human decency.  Ryo was just a student walking home, then struck by a nearly silent police cruiser going at excess speed, and the NYPD covered it up. 

Here is the side-by-side comparison of the released video footage, including updates from the case.  *Edit*  This article contains a link to a graphic video moments after the crash, showing the body of Ryo Oyamada and NY citizens yelling at the police.  Please advise, it is highly disturbing. 

And the following is an excerpt from the petition, which as of now only has 286 signatures.

BOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOST

Omg 

(via knowledgeequalsblackpower)

workingamerica:

MYTH: “If you raise the minimum wage, things will become more expensive!”

FACT: Things are already getting more expensive, but fewer people can pay for them. (Chart via SEIU and George Miller)

ACTION: Tell Speaker Boehner to hold a vote to #RaisetheWage
—> http://bit.ly/1pz7V5r http://ift.tt/1BWbCqI

(via truth-has-a-liberal-bias)

atane:

The above are the first 3 responses to Dr. Redmond’s spot on tweet. This is the boorish behavior that Black people have to deal with from white people for merely speaking out against white supremacy. The harassment from white people towards Black people is constant and virulent. If you’re a Black person speaking out against white supremacy, white people will attack you or at the very least, they will have a major problem with you. They will attack you more than a “good” white person saying the exact same thing. Tim Wise does not put up with an inkling of the abuse Black people endure and he isn’t saying anything new. Discourse about white supremacy from a white mouth is more palatable to the white masses than from the mouths of those victimized by white supremacy.
Ironically, the “good” white people become like the rest of their white brethren when they attempt to separate themselves by saying “not all white people”. They too become a nuisance that everlastingly badgers. They are largely silent about injustice, inequity and marginalization at the hands of white supremacy. However, the minute the marginalized speak out against their abusers, they are quick to lend a voice in defense of the abusers. It’s because even when white people are clearly abusers, other white people still see their humanity. In the face of this abuse, merely pointing out that the perpetrators of the abuse are white angers white people. The abuse itself doesn’t elicit the same level of anger from them.
Another problem are these alleged white liberals. Truth be told, I get more harassment from white liberals than from anyone else. White conservatives don’t hide their disdain for Blackness. For them, it’s a badge of honor. We know where they stand. White liberals in contrast tend to be silent, but will speak up to center themselves in a crisis or will be apologetic towards white abusers, instead of condemning them. Many will not acknowledge that white supremacy even exists. If they do acknowledge a problem, they will wrap it up in empty platitudes about everyone needing to get along, how they don’t see race, how we’re all human, how they have Black friends or whatever post-racial nonsense they ascribe to, as if that addresses white supremacy. They believe that the problem “goes both ways”. 
If the above isn’t you as a white person, do not take this as your cue to respond with “not all white people”. As the saying goes, the hit dog will holler. If something does not apply to you, then why are you hollering? Did I hit you? Maybe I did. The only thing many white people can bring themselves to say in response to Black suffering and white supremacy is “not all white people” or "this is reverse racism" or their favorite chopped up MLK Jr. quote “hate cannot drive out hate”. The response from white people is never a unanimous “the system of white supremacy is a scourge that must end and we must fight to end it”. It is never that.
Whiteness will always justify the extermination of Blackness. Mike Brown was gunned down in Ferguson by officer Darren Wilson and the Ferguson police in turn releases video stills of what they claim to be Brown being an alleged criminal days after his murder. This was completely unrelated to his murder, but there is always a reason for dead Black bodies when whiteness governs. So why did they release these stills if the Ferguson police themselves have admitted that it is completely unrelated to Brown’s murder at the hands of officer Darren Wilson? They did it to smear his image. This is a tactic of white supremacy. It always smears the image of a Black victim.
When Black people are victimized and dehumanized, they still aren’t quite human in the eyes of many white people. At least not on the level of white humanity. It’s why a white terrorist like Dzhokhar Tsarnaev can be put on the cover of Rolling Stone, like he’s a heartthrob in a boy band, and be described as “popular and promising”, while unarmed Black people murdered by white people are criminalized in death. Their image gets smeared because full victimhood is relegated to whiteness. Innocence and chasteness will be awarded to a white murderer before a Black murder victim.
I don’t argue or engage with white people on this subject anymore. This Malcolm X quote is forever relevant. I’ll respond or say my piece if need be, but I won’t debate a white person about Black humanity. My response to “good” white folks will always be “go and get your people”. That’s all I have to say to them. Truly good white people don’t need to be told that. They know. Word to John Brown.
atane:

The above are the first 3 responses to Dr. Redmond’s spot on tweet. This is the boorish behavior that Black people have to deal with from white people for merely speaking out against white supremacy. The harassment from white people towards Black people is constant and virulent. If you’re a Black person speaking out against white supremacy, white people will attack you or at the very least, they will have a major problem with you. They will attack you more than a “good” white person saying the exact same thing. Tim Wise does not put up with an inkling of the abuse Black people endure and he isn’t saying anything new. Discourse about white supremacy from a white mouth is more palatable to the white masses than from the mouths of those victimized by white supremacy.
Ironically, the “good” white people become like the rest of their white brethren when they attempt to separate themselves by saying “not all white people”. They too become a nuisance that everlastingly badgers. They are largely silent about injustice, inequity and marginalization at the hands of white supremacy. However, the minute the marginalized speak out against their abusers, they are quick to lend a voice in defense of the abusers. It’s because even when white people are clearly abusers, other white people still see their humanity. In the face of this abuse, merely pointing out that the perpetrators of the abuse are white angers white people. The abuse itself doesn’t elicit the same level of anger from them.
Another problem are these alleged white liberals. Truth be told, I get more harassment from white liberals than from anyone else. White conservatives don’t hide their disdain for Blackness. For them, it’s a badge of honor. We know where they stand. White liberals in contrast tend to be silent, but will speak up to center themselves in a crisis or will be apologetic towards white abusers, instead of condemning them. Many will not acknowledge that white supremacy even exists. If they do acknowledge a problem, they will wrap it up in empty platitudes about everyone needing to get along, how they don’t see race, how we’re all human, how they have Black friends or whatever post-racial nonsense they ascribe to, as if that addresses white supremacy. They believe that the problem “goes both ways”. 
If the above isn’t you as a white person, do not take this as your cue to respond with “not all white people”. As the saying goes, the hit dog will holler. If something does not apply to you, then why are you hollering? Did I hit you? Maybe I did. The only thing many white people can bring themselves to say in response to Black suffering and white supremacy is “not all white people” or "this is reverse racism" or their favorite chopped up MLK Jr. quote “hate cannot drive out hate”. The response from white people is never a unanimous “the system of white supremacy is a scourge that must end and we must fight to end it”. It is never that.
Whiteness will always justify the extermination of Blackness. Mike Brown was gunned down in Ferguson by officer Darren Wilson and the Ferguson police in turn releases video stills of what they claim to be Brown being an alleged criminal days after his murder. This was completely unrelated to his murder, but there is always a reason for dead Black bodies when whiteness governs. So why did they release these stills if the Ferguson police themselves have admitted that it is completely unrelated to Brown’s murder at the hands of officer Darren Wilson? They did it to smear his image. This is a tactic of white supremacy. It always smears the image of a Black victim.
When Black people are victimized and dehumanized, they still aren’t quite human in the eyes of many white people. At least not on the level of white humanity. It’s why a white terrorist like Dzhokhar Tsarnaev can be put on the cover of Rolling Stone, like he’s a heartthrob in a boy band, and be described as “popular and promising”, while unarmed Black people murdered by white people are criminalized in death. Their image gets smeared because full victimhood is relegated to whiteness. Innocence and chasteness will be awarded to a white murderer before a Black murder victim.
I don’t argue or engage with white people on this subject anymore. This Malcolm X quote is forever relevant. I’ll respond or say my piece if need be, but I won’t debate a white person about Black humanity. My response to “good” white folks will always be “go and get your people”. That’s all I have to say to them. Truly good white people don’t need to be told that. They know. Word to John Brown.

atane:

The above are the first 3 responses to Dr. Redmond’s spot on tweet. This is the boorish behavior that Black people have to deal with from white people for merely speaking out against white supremacy. The harassment from white people towards Black people is constant and virulent. If you’re a Black person speaking out against white supremacy, white people will attack you or at the very least, they will have a major problem with you. They will attack you more than a “good” white person saying the exact same thing. Tim Wise does not put up with an inkling of the abuse Black people endure and he isn’t saying anything new. Discourse about white supremacy from a white mouth is more palatable to the white masses than from the mouths of those victimized by white supremacy.

Ironically, the “good” white people become like the rest of their white brethren when they attempt to separate themselves by saying “not all white people”. They too become a nuisance that everlastingly badgers. They are largely silent about injustice, inequity and marginalization at the hands of white supremacy. However, the minute the marginalized speak out against their abusers, they are quick to lend a voice in defense of the abusers. It’s because even when white people are clearly abusers, other white people still see their humanity. In the face of this abuse, merely pointing out that the perpetrators of the abuse are white angers white people. The abuse itself doesn’t elicit the same level of anger from them.

Another problem are these alleged white liberals. Truth be told, I get more harassment from white liberals than from anyone else. White conservatives don’t hide their disdain for Blackness. For them, it’s a badge of honor. We know where they stand. White liberals in contrast tend to be silent, but will speak up to center themselves in a crisis or will be apologetic towards white abusers, instead of condemning them. Many will not acknowledge that white supremacy even exists. If they do acknowledge a problem, they will wrap it up in empty platitudes about everyone needing to get along, how they don’t see race, how we’re all human, how they have Black friends or whatever post-racial nonsense they ascribe to, as if that addresses white supremacy. They believe that the problem “goes both ways”.

If the above isn’t you as a white person, do not take this as your cue to respond with “not all white people”. As the saying goes, the hit dog will holler. If something does not apply to you, then why are you hollering? Did I hit you? Maybe I did. The only thing many white people can bring themselves to say in response to Black suffering and white supremacy is “not all white people” or "this is reverse racism" or their favorite chopped up MLK Jr. quote “hate cannot drive out hate”. The response from white people is never a unanimous “the system of white supremacy is a scourge that must end and we must fight to end it”. It is never that.

Whiteness will always justify the extermination of Blackness. Mike Brown was gunned down in Ferguson by officer Darren Wilson and the Ferguson police in turn releases video stills of what they claim to be Brown being an alleged criminal days after his murder. This was completely unrelated to his murder, but there is always a reason for dead Black bodies when whiteness governs. So why did they release these stills if the Ferguson police themselves have admitted that it is completely unrelated to Brown’s murder at the hands of officer Darren Wilson? They did it to smear his image. This is a tactic of white supremacy. It always smears the image of a Black victim.

When Black people are victimized and dehumanized, they still aren’t quite human in the eyes of many white people. At least not on the level of white humanity. It’s why a white terrorist like Dzhokhar Tsarnaev can be put on the cover of Rolling Stone, like he’s a heartthrob in a boy band, and be described as “popular and promising”, while unarmed Black people murdered by white people are criminalized in death. Their image gets smeared because full victimhood is relegated to whiteness. Innocence and chasteness will be awarded to a white murderer before a Black murder victim.

I don’t argue or engage with white people on this subject anymore. This Malcolm X quote is forever relevant. I’ll respond or say my piece if need be, but I won’t debate a white person about Black humanity. My response to “good” white folks will always be “go and get your people”. That’s all I have to say to them. Truly good white people don’t need to be told that. They know. Word to John Brown.

(via whatwhiteswillneverknow)

jessehimself:

http://deliriumbubbles.tumblr.com/post/95772647194/they-both-reached-for-the-gun

There was no struggle.

Darren Wilson was not injured. That was from a previous injury.

There was no gunpowder on Mike Brown’s body, so he didn’t fire the gun.

People believe what they want to believe, even though every lie the Ferguson police have come up with has been shoddy and easily debunked. Someone’s going to get away with murder, though.

(via the-uncensored-she)

scienceyoucanlove:

Give Neil deGrasse Tyson an Emmy
By T.C. Sottek 
Science is cool. Really cool! So cool that when humans do something really big in science — like putting a remote-control robot on another planet — the whole world stands still to watch. So cool that it seems like this year we’ve seen Bill Nye’s face more than ever. So cool that science invaded mainstream arts with the return of Cosmos, and we crowned Neil deGrasse Tyson as a brainy superstar. So why wasn’t he sitting near Matthew McConaughey last night at the Emmys?
He never had a chance, because the Television Academy didn’t give him one.
Shows like Cosmos live in the academy’s closet, in a box behind the costumes, where they don’t have to be seen next to the beautiful people. Every year, the academy rounds up all the nerds and sequesters them to the “Creative Arts Emmys:” a giant overflow room where you put people who basically make television happen but aren’t good enough to be on television. I mean, just look at Matthew McConaughey. We can’t have nerds sitting next to him! Only people who play nerds on television, like those guys fromThe Big Bang Theory.
To some degree this is a logistical problem and the academy’s solution makes total sense. The Primetime Emmys, like The Oscars, seem to drag on forever, and putting the Creative Arts awards in there would make it a 12 hour show. But it’s not all or nothing. The academy has made choices about what it wants to put on television that have nothing to do time constraints. It has decided (resoundingly!) that the host of Dancing with the Stars is more important than the host of Cosmos. This particular perversion bites twice: once when we realize we’re actually getting what we deserve as a society making our own choices about what to watch on TV, and again when we realize that the very locus of “reality” in the TV universe corresponds more to a show wherein people win money from Howie Mandel’s army of models than a scientific series that literally describes reality.

The truth is that there isn’t even an award category for people who host shows like Cosmos.
The Emmys are, as one Hollywood insider told me today, “where taste goes to die.” It’s where Modern Family wins awards over shows like Louie, which even the dim court of public opinion seems to find patently unreasonable. My colleague Sam Byford put it well: “shows like the Emmys exist in a weird space between critical acclaim and pure ratings,” he said. And of course, we tend to lean towards the side of critical claim when a show or an actor we kinda like wins. (I’m looking at your perfectly grown cheekbones, Benedict Cumberbatch.)
So, yeah, the Emmys are superficial and often tone deaf. This is as novel as Hollywood insiders are unpredictable. But it could at least appear to appreciate where science and art collide on the main stage, even for just a few minutes a year.
read more from the Verge 
scienceyoucanlove:

Give Neil deGrasse Tyson an Emmy
By T.C. Sottek 
Science is cool. Really cool! So cool that when humans do something really big in science — like putting a remote-control robot on another planet — the whole world stands still to watch. So cool that it seems like this year we’ve seen Bill Nye’s face more than ever. So cool that science invaded mainstream arts with the return of Cosmos, and we crowned Neil deGrasse Tyson as a brainy superstar. So why wasn’t he sitting near Matthew McConaughey last night at the Emmys?
He never had a chance, because the Television Academy didn’t give him one.
Shows like Cosmos live in the academy’s closet, in a box behind the costumes, where they don’t have to be seen next to the beautiful people. Every year, the academy rounds up all the nerds and sequesters them to the “Creative Arts Emmys:” a giant overflow room where you put people who basically make television happen but aren’t good enough to be on television. I mean, just look at Matthew McConaughey. We can’t have nerds sitting next to him! Only people who play nerds on television, like those guys fromThe Big Bang Theory.
To some degree this is a logistical problem and the academy’s solution makes total sense. The Primetime Emmys, like The Oscars, seem to drag on forever, and putting the Creative Arts awards in there would make it a 12 hour show. But it’s not all or nothing. The academy has made choices about what it wants to put on television that have nothing to do time constraints. It has decided (resoundingly!) that the host of Dancing with the Stars is more important than the host of Cosmos. This particular perversion bites twice: once when we realize we’re actually getting what we deserve as a society making our own choices about what to watch on TV, and again when we realize that the very locus of “reality” in the TV universe corresponds more to a show wherein people win money from Howie Mandel’s army of models than a scientific series that literally describes reality.

The truth is that there isn’t even an award category for people who host shows like Cosmos.
The Emmys are, as one Hollywood insider told me today, “where taste goes to die.” It’s where Modern Family wins awards over shows like Louie, which even the dim court of public opinion seems to find patently unreasonable. My colleague Sam Byford put it well: “shows like the Emmys exist in a weird space between critical acclaim and pure ratings,” he said. And of course, we tend to lean towards the side of critical claim when a show or an actor we kinda like wins. (I’m looking at your perfectly grown cheekbones, Benedict Cumberbatch.)
So, yeah, the Emmys are superficial and often tone deaf. This is as novel as Hollywood insiders are unpredictable. But it could at least appear to appreciate where science and art collide on the main stage, even for just a few minutes a year.
read more from the Verge 
scienceyoucanlove:

Give Neil deGrasse Tyson an Emmy
By T.C. Sottek 
Science is cool. Really cool! So cool that when humans do something really big in science — like putting a remote-control robot on another planet — the whole world stands still to watch. So cool that it seems like this year we’ve seen Bill Nye’s face more than ever. So cool that science invaded mainstream arts with the return of Cosmos, and we crowned Neil deGrasse Tyson as a brainy superstar. So why wasn’t he sitting near Matthew McConaughey last night at the Emmys?
He never had a chance, because the Television Academy didn’t give him one.
Shows like Cosmos live in the academy’s closet, in a box behind the costumes, where they don’t have to be seen next to the beautiful people. Every year, the academy rounds up all the nerds and sequesters them to the “Creative Arts Emmys:” a giant overflow room where you put people who basically make television happen but aren’t good enough to be on television. I mean, just look at Matthew McConaughey. We can’t have nerds sitting next to him! Only people who play nerds on television, like those guys fromThe Big Bang Theory.
To some degree this is a logistical problem and the academy’s solution makes total sense. The Primetime Emmys, like The Oscars, seem to drag on forever, and putting the Creative Arts awards in there would make it a 12 hour show. But it’s not all or nothing. The academy has made choices about what it wants to put on television that have nothing to do time constraints. It has decided (resoundingly!) that the host of Dancing with the Stars is more important than the host of Cosmos. This particular perversion bites twice: once when we realize we’re actually getting what we deserve as a society making our own choices about what to watch on TV, and again when we realize that the very locus of “reality” in the TV universe corresponds more to a show wherein people win money from Howie Mandel’s army of models than a scientific series that literally describes reality.

The truth is that there isn’t even an award category for people who host shows like Cosmos.
The Emmys are, as one Hollywood insider told me today, “where taste goes to die.” It’s where Modern Family wins awards over shows like Louie, which even the dim court of public opinion seems to find patently unreasonable. My colleague Sam Byford put it well: “shows like the Emmys exist in a weird space between critical acclaim and pure ratings,” he said. And of course, we tend to lean towards the side of critical claim when a show or an actor we kinda like wins. (I’m looking at your perfectly grown cheekbones, Benedict Cumberbatch.)
So, yeah, the Emmys are superficial and often tone deaf. This is as novel as Hollywood insiders are unpredictable. But it could at least appear to appreciate where science and art collide on the main stage, even for just a few minutes a year.
read more from the Verge 

scienceyoucanlove:

Give Neil deGrasse Tyson an Emmy

By T.C. Sottek 

Science is cool. Really cool! So cool that when humans do something really big in science — like putting a remote-control robot on another planet — the whole world stands still to watch. So cool that it seems like this year we’ve seen Bill Nye’s face more than ever. So cool that science invaded mainstream arts with the return of Cosmos, and we crowned Neil deGrasse Tyson as a brainy superstar. So why wasn’t he sitting near Matthew McConaughey last night at the Emmys?

He never had a chance, because the Television Academy didn’t give him one.

Shows like Cosmos live in the academy’s closet, in a box behind the costumes, where they don’t have to be seen next to the beautiful people. Every year, the academy rounds up all the nerds and sequesters them to the “Creative Arts Emmys:” a giant overflow room where you put people who basically make television happen but aren’t good enough to be on television. I mean, just look at Matthew McConaughey. We can’t have nerds sitting next to him! Only people who play nerds on television, like those guys fromThe Big Bang Theory.

To some degree this is a logistical problem and the academy’s solution makes total sense. The Primetime Emmys, like The Oscars, seem to drag on forever, and putting the Creative Arts awards in there would make it a 12 hour show. But it’s not all or nothing. The academy has made choices about what it wants to put on television that have nothing to do time constraints. It has decided (resoundingly!) that the host of Dancing with the Stars is more important than the host of Cosmos. This particular perversion bites twice: once when we realize we’re actually getting what we deserve as a society making our own choices about what to watch on TV, and again when we realize that the very locus of “reality” in the TV universe corresponds more to a show wherein people win money from Howie Mandel’s army of models than a scientific series that literally describes reality.

The truth is that there isn’t even an award category for people who host shows like Cosmos.

The Emmys are, as one Hollywood insider told me today, “where taste goes to die.” It’s where Modern Family wins awards over shows like Louie, which even the dim court of public opinion seems to find patently unreasonable. My colleague Sam Byford put it well: “shows like the Emmys exist in a weird space between critical acclaim and pure ratings,” he said. And of course, we tend to lean towards the side of critical claim when a show or an actor we kinda like wins. (I’m looking at your perfectly grown cheekbones, Benedict Cumberbatch.)

So, yeah, the Emmys are superficial and often tone deaf. This is as novel as Hollywood insiders are unpredictable. But it could at least appear to appreciate where science and art collide on the main stage, even for just a few minutes a year.

read more from the Verge 

bikenesmith:

im really tired of europeans on here reblogging posts about racism in america and adding shocked disapproving comments like “get it together america lol” as if there isn’t an enormous amount of racism in europe and as if it wasn’t the europeans that first colonized the new world that planted the seed of racism in north america

(via the-uncensored-she)

dykesupremacy:

lesbians are the greatest ever and if you disagree you’re wrong and jealous

(via the-uncensored-she)

the-uncensored-she:

evilfeminist:

Where’s Cox’s support and sympathy for Ebony Nicole Williams and her family? Oh, that’s right. That little girl, who’s life was snuffed out by a child killer in drag, was “cis-scum”, and Cox and “her” ilk only care about rapists, child-molesters and murderers in drag.

I’m with the Uncensored She on the point of Cox supporting a child rapist-murderer being absolutely appalling and unacceptable, however putting the word Her in parentheses (when referring to Cox) is completely unnecessary.

Do not stoop to that level, no matter what.

“America comes in 86th place in a global ranking of women elected to government cabinet positions. It comes after Muslim-majority nations like Afghanistan, Pakistan, Bangladesh, Iraq, Sudan and Saudi Arabia.”
“People called rock & roll ‘African music.’ They called it ‘voodoo music.’ They said that it would drive the kids insane. They said that it was just a flash in the pan - the same thing that they always used to say about hip-hop.”

LITTLE RICHARD (via blackgirlsrpretty2)

Would ya look at that…for folks who still don’t know who created certain genres of music, here you have it. Now, lets not let hip hop go the same route in the next few decades. After all, those who don’t know history are bound to repeat it.

(via siddharthasmama)

(via knowledgeequalsblackpower)